The First River Runners

Triad River Tours was founded in 2012, but humans have been on the rivers for hundreds of years before us. Many pacific Northwest tribes have historically relied on the region’s rivers for survival; they provided transportation, food, and water year-round. These tribes gained a deep understanding of the rivers and how to live in balance with them, keeping what they needed without destroying the river. One of our goals as a whitewater rafting company is to keep this balance ourselves. Here are some of the tribes that made their homes around the same rivers we raft today.


Upper Skagit

The Upper Skagit tribe consisted of many villages along the river, as opposed to one group. Like many tribes in Northwest Washington, they traditionally speak a form of the Salish language, Lushootseed in particular. According to the Upper Skagit NPAIHB page, “Elders’ stories were woven from the river and its surroundings. The stories revealed to the next generation where the best salmon fishing was and where to hunt game in the mountains, how to find sacred ground in the mountains, and where to bathe in the river for healing. Spiritual ceremonies also were held, with smoke and fire as a medium.”


    Sauk-Suiattle

The Sauk-Suiattle tribe is also known as the Sah-ku-mehu. Like the Upper Skagit, they speak the Salishan language Lushootseed, which now only consists of a few living fluent speakers. The rivers they ran included the Sauk, Suiattle, Stillaguamish, Cascade, and Skagit rivers. White Horse Mountain in the North Cascades was their homeland, but they would travel in their hand made canoes to Puget Sound, where they harvested fish and shellfish. According to their website, the Sauk-Suiattle tribe had dwindled down to 18 members in 1924, but currently stands at over 300 today.


    Nooksack

Many pacific Northwest tribes have historically relied on the region’s rivers for survival; they provided transportation, food, and water year-round.

Many pacific Northwest tribes have historically relied on the region’s rivers for survival; they provided transportation, food, and water year-round.

The Nooksack tribe is one of the oldest surviving tribes in the Washington area. They speak  Lhéchalosem, a Salishan language. Nooksack translates in their language to “always bracken fern roots.” They reside in Deming, Washington, about 15 miles east of Bellingham. Their website states that they have lived on the land since the very first humans lived there. They used skills such as fishing, hunting, clam digging, and root gathering for survival, and created allies with neighboring tribes to trade with. Since receiving full federal recognition in 1971, they have increased their land holding to 2,500 acres, and have increased in population to around 2,000 compared to 250 years ago when there were only 1,200 to 1,500 people.


    Snoqualmie

Along with the Nooksack tribe, the Snoqualmie have been a part of the Washington area since time immemorial. They lived on the Snoqualmie River from North Bend to the Skykomish River junction. They speak the southern dialect of Lushootseed. Despite this language’s status on the endangered list, they are making efforts to preserve it. They are also very involved in environmental preservation. Many of their beliefs are rooted in their relationship with nature, and how it connects them to their ancestors. They’ve created Environmental and Natural Resources, an organization that, according to their website, “works to enhance, protect, and preserve the environment of the Snoqualmie reservation and traditional Tribal lands through habitat and water quality improvement projects, waste reduction and recycling, energy conservation, and education.”


Lummi Nation

The Lummi Nation has inhabited Puget Sound for thousands of years. They are the third largest tribe in the U.S., with over 5,000 tribe members and 13,000 acres of land. Currently, they reside in a peninsula between Bellingham Bay and Georgia Strait. They speak the traditional Salishan language, with a Georgia Strait dialect. They take pride in finding a balance between using modern technology and honoring the traditions of their ancestors. 


While this just barely scratches the surface of the tribes that ran the rivers, I hope you  feel inclined to read more about these indigenous tribes. I’ve attached their main websites along with some other sources below so you can read even more about their cultures, histories, and the impact they had on the area.



Sources:

https://www.washingtontribes.org/tribes-map


Upper Skagit

http://www.npaihb.org/member-tribes/upper-skagit-tribe/#1450475820391-49a99642-a785


Sauk-Suiattle

http://www.sauk-suiattle.com/

http://www.npaihb.org/member-tribes/sauk-suiattle-tribe/#1450733500099-3a73d48a-0223


Nooksack

https://nooksacktribe.org/about/

http://www.npaihb.org/member-tribes/nooksack-tribe/



Snoqualmie

http://snoqualmietribe.us/

http://www.npaihb.org/member-tribes/snoqualmie-tribe/#1450475820392-65215ee8-17e6


Lummi

http://www.lummi-nsn.org/

http://www.npaihb.org/member-tribes/lummi-nation/#1450475820391-49a99642-a785

Read more:

Six Things I Learned From the River

Four Reasons Life is Better on the River


Common Butterflies Near Triad River Tours

    When it comes to summer insects, my first thoughts are far from positive. Gnats, ticks, and mosquitoes have been the bane of many an outdoor adventure, but they aren’t the only insects in town: summer is also the season of butterflies! They can be found all over the Pacific Northwest, especially during rafting season. I’ll be covering a few of the most common butterflies in our neck of the woods, but there are plenty more in the Washington area to explore here if you’re interested!


Painted Lady

The painted lady is one of the most common butterflies in the world, found on every continent besides Antarctica. The patterns on their wings are somewhat similar to a monarch butterfly’s, and are commonly mislabeled as such, however, monarchs are typically only spotted in eastern Washington, if spotted at all in our state. They are most prominent in California, which is part of their yearly migration pattern, but more and more have been finding their way to our northern states. WSU associate professor of entomology David James has two theories. The first is that the heavy rain California has been getting has caused a major detour in their migration. His second theory is that their sudden rise in population is due to elementary classrooms that have raised entire generations of the butterflies and then released them into the wild, which really isn’t as crazy as it sounds! Either way, the painted ladies are here and they can be spotted on all over our rivers!


Western Tiger Swallowtail

While tiger swallowtail butterflies can be found in nearly every state, there is one species often spotted here in Washington that can only be found out west. The Western Tiger Swallowtail varies slightly from its eastern counterparts with thicker and darker inner body stripes. They are most active between the months of June and July, but can be spotted year round in some areas where the temperature stays warm through the winter. Their ideal breeding ground is wooded areas around rivers and streams. You can spot them near their food source: the wildflowers that grow in the area.


Red Admiral

This is another very common species around the world. The Red Admiral feeds on tree sap and fermented fruit (one of the few species that only drinks flower nectar as a last resort), so it prefers wet, wooded areas. These hardy critters can live almost anywhere they want year round, and they change colors based on the weather they are in. In the summer, their vibrant orange and red spots shine bright on their large brown wings, but in the winter their color dulls down and they actually become smaller.


Butterflies are notoriously friendly and it is not uncommon to meet brave ones that aren’t afraid of humans. Book your next whitewater river rafting trip with us today to see if you can spot any of these butterflies on your trip, and possibly make a new winged best friend!


Sources:

https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2019/may/28/once-common-in-eastern-washington-the-monarch-butt/

https://www.insectidentification.org/insect-description.asp?identification=Western-Tiger-Swallowtail-Butterfly

https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Vanessa-atalanta



Read more:

What Wildlife Will You See Rafting?

Washington’s Wonderful Wildflowers

Six Tips for Picking the Best Post-Whitewater Rafting Campsite

Six Tips for Picking the Best Post-Whitewater Rafting Campsite

Camping out the night before or after a whitewater rafting trip is a rite of passage that many of our guests partake in. But during summer months, planning for a campsite on busy days can be difficult. Some of us have the same campsites we like to revisit each year, others find new campsites each time. Here are some important points to note when locating your campsite on you upcoming overnight rafting adventure.